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REGISTRATION IS ON for the 2018 Piano Camp for Piano Teachers “Power UP Practice”- Attend LIVE WEBINARS + Receive LIFETIME ACCESS Replays

SEE the UPDATE NOTICE at the end of the post! 

So thrilled to welcome you to the 2018 Piano Camp for Piano Teachers with a theme on an all-too-important topic for piano teachers – “Practice.” This year’s event “Power UP Practice!” will come to you via WEBINAR with VIDEO REPLAYS complete with LIFETIME ACCESS! This may be the first conference ever to focus solely on aspects of practicing and the related issues we teachers deal with each and every day.

Check out all the details here.

The 2018 Piano Camp for Piano Teachers will showcase 6 different clinicians who will deliver lectures on practice strategies, techniques, motivation, incentives, mindset, modes of communication, and much more!

You’ll have a chance to interact with these clinicians and other participants, ask questions, plus….there will be door prizes for LIVE attendees. Even if you can’t attend the LIVE webinars, you’ll receive access to the replays and we’ll have a digital goodie bag saved for you.

Attend the webinars LIVE on July 26 and 27, 2018 via your computer or mobile device AND/OR watch at your leisure later on your own time with no expiration!

Yes! I’ll RESERVE my SEAT NOW!


BUT WAIT! Did you miss last year’s Piano Camp for Piano Teachers with the amazing Marvin Blickenstaff?

You can sign up for the the NEW 2018 VIP Bundle! and receive instant online access to Marvin’s online camp today PLUS receive the “2018 Piano Camp for Piano Teachers – Power UP Practice!”  – both at the discounted rate!  View the bundle HERE (and it’s available on split payments!).

Register for just the 2018 camp here

Register for both the 2017 & 2018 camps here


UPDATE! The LIVE webinars have concluded and were just amazing.  Teachers LOVED the sessions and walked away with new tips, tools, and techniques to boost “practicing” with their students and parents!  To celebrate, we’ve extended the PRE-REGISTRATION to MIdnight Central, August 1!  Grab it before it goes away.  You won’t be disappointed! 

motionmailapp.com Committed to your success!

Elizabeth

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NEW video course! “A Simple Step-by-Step Start to Major Scales”

“A Simple Step-by-Step Start to Major Scales – All Without A Book” has officially launched over at the Piano Teacher Academy!  Be sure to grab the early-bird launch price before it expires tomorrow, WED, April 25, at midnight Central.  The early bird has EXPIRED, but there is a now an easy-payment plan option!

Go here to see all the details and enroll now: http://bit.ly/startscales

If you’ve been looking for a way to systematically introduce major scales to your students and avoid overwhelm and confusion for both you and your student(s), this course is for YOU.  In this video course I outline the approach I’ve honed and tailored over many years.  I find that it works quite well for ages 5 through adult and lends itself to the personal pace of any student. I’ve also used it many times in group situations.  It works for early-level students as well as transfers in need of remedial help and adults could easily use this video course as a self-guided program in learning scales for the first time or as a refresher.

NOTE:  If you purchased the ONLINE version of the 2017 Piano Camp for Piano Teachers with Marvin Blickenstaff, you already have this course in your bundle, so no need to purchase it! 

But…..I have added some bonus student videos + a week-by-week lesson assignment plan so be sure to check those out. 


In this video course you’ll be taken by the hand and guided through the entire process.

1. I inform you exactly what elementary students should know before introducing them to major scales.

2. I give you straight-forward, done-for-you PDFs to use right in the lesson.

3. Sample student videos are included so you can view activities in action.

4. You receive a week-by-week assignment plan to guide you every step of the way. No wondering what to do each week!

Everything is laid out in a simple, easy-to-follow order.

Just a clear, simple path to starting scales with your students, young and old, with LIFETIME access so you can refer to it anytime.

 

If you have ANY questions, leave a comment below or contact Elizabeth at elizabeth@pianoteacheracademy.com. Standing by to help!

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New Year, New Attitude!

Too all of you I wish much happiness and success in 2018 and thank you for your support in 2017!  May you each live out your creative dreams and cherish all the amazing musical experiences coming your way as a musician and teacher.  I’m overflowing with ideas for new projects and goals for this year and am so excited about the possibilities both here on the blog, Piano Camp for Piano Teachers, and at Piano Teacher Academy.  Thanks for joining me on the journey!

TO CELEBRATE 2018, we have Piano Camp for Piano Teachers T-shirts for you WITH FREE SHIPPING! (still going – only $19.97!)

#pianoteacherboss

This shirt will start the year right, won’t it? It’s been such a popular item, that we decided to make the shirts available online.  And for followers like you, each is only $19.97 with the shipping included. Receive your shirt in 4-5 business days and shipping is FREE for ANY QUANTITY that you order. So pick one up for you and a friend. Some sizes are limited so hurry!

CLICK HERE to ORDER 

This 2nd style has also been quite popular with students and piano enthusiasts in general

#itfeelsgoodtobeapianist

Here are the available colors in sizes XS-2XL

ORDER HERE

SIZES and DETAILS:

2 T-shirt styles in various colors are available for each as seen above. Adult sizes available: XS-2XL. Unisex sizing – retail fit.  They fit both women and men nicely. 100% combed and ringspun cotton. Very soft fabric and very little shrinkage.  Perfect for layering.

NOTE:  If you don’t see your size available in your preferred style/color, please email us at info@pianoteachercamp.com.  If we have enough requests, we’ll place a re-order.  The more requests we receive, the faster we’ll make that re-order so SHARE this post with friends!

👊 2018, let’s do this!

 

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REGISTER NOW for the 2017 Piano Camp for Piano Teachers with Marvin Blickenstaff – Attend LIVE or ONLINE!

So excited to announce our guest clinician for this year’s Piano Camp for Piano Teachers, the highly sought-after and beloved Marvin Blickenstaff!  For years Marvin has been providing teachers worldwide with insightfully creative, thoughtful teaching techniques that just work and he’s the one they flock to for workshops, lectures, and master classes.

Now you can see Marvin in-person at the 2017 Piano Camp for Piano Teachers in the lovely San Antonio, TX or at your leisure via your computer or mobile device!

JOIN US on Friday, June  30, 2017 at RBC Pepper South Texas in San Antonio (formerly RBC Music Company) if you would like to see Marvin in action, ask him questions, and share a lovely lunch with him. OR…..Join him via your computer or mobile device beginning on/around July 10 and watch the videotaped lectures from that day.  All participants, both LIVE and online, will have access to the recorded version of the workshop (4 sessions) thru December 31, 2017.

Click HERE to view all the details plus the workshop topics. You may register for either the LIVE workshop on June 30 or the online version.

******IN-PERSON participants:  Seats are still available as of June 25.  If the registration link is open, you may still register.  All of you will have a chance for Q&A with Marvin, you’ll receive lunch on site, plus door prizes and the videos as well!

Yes! I’ll RESERVE my SEAT NOW!

Look forward to seeing you in person on June 30 or ONLINE!

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FREE PREVIEW of ONLINE “Piano Camp for Piano Teachers”!

So THRILLED to announce that the ONLINE version of the June 24 Piano Camp for Piano Teachers (Houston, TX) is now available for those who could not make it to the LIVE event.

UPDATE!!! – the online version of the 2016 Piano Camp for Piano Teachers is now an online course entitled:  “Sorting Out the Piano Classics”  Read all about it HERE.  Grab it at the introductory price BEFORE OCT. 1, 2016!

Here’s what’s included: 

  • Five intensive sessions (7+ hours of video) outlining a logical teaching order of standard piano literature, Baroque to Contemporary, from the late elementary to early advanced levels.
  • Demonstration of example repertoire.
  • Useful teaching tips and techniques you can take right to the studio.
  • Handouts to inform you what to teach at each level.
  • PDF guides to help you match method books and repertoire collections to each level of study.

You will have LIFETIME ACCESS to this course and all content upgrades added in the future. View on a desktop computer, laptop, or mobile device.  No special software required for viewing.


A glimpse of the curriculum below.  Click HERE to see the contents and watch a FREE PREVIEW! (see the module entitled “Presentation of Intermediate Pieces by Era – Romantic/Modern”)

Course Curriculum Screen ShotSee you on the inside!


What teachers are saying:

“I have watched about half of the videos and printed the handouts and can tell everyone that a LOT of work has gone into this Camp. If you are getting your repertoire lists ready for the fall and wanting a good sampling of classical pieces, this is the place to go. It is complete with an extensive list divided by levels and Elizabeth plays a sampling of most of them. The handouts include musical examples also.”

Lizbeth Atkinson – Columbus, OH

“I have enjoyed and benefited from the videos so much. I enter my students in our state program each year. Our state has 12 levels similar to Jane Magrath but 12!!! It has really been hard for me since my college back in the 70’s did not have a good pedagogy class. Thanks for your consideration!”

Betty Lawson – Tucson, AZ

 

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NEW! Gutierrez Piano Music is Now on the Blog!

Gutierrez Music on BlogTeachers have been asking me to place all my educational piano pieces in one place on the blog and finally it’s done! When you click on SHOP on the menu above, you’ll see 3 categories: Ebooks, Sheet Music, and Sheet Music Downloads.

Under SHEET MUSIC, you’ll see all the hard-copy material published under my name — sheet solos, collections, and one reference book. You can click each title and read a description of the work and see a page view in most instances. So have fun browsing and if you find something of interest to you, you can certainly order direct from the blog (via Sheet Music Plus), but I urge you to order copies from your local sheet music retailer. Please support them whenever you can. They are such an important asset to the future of music in our communities and we need to keep them in business.

Stay tuned for upcoming Ebooks and Sheet Music Downloads. I’ll reveal those goodies soon. Be sure to subscribe to the blog off to right to stay updated.

Gutierrez Music PeriscopeTo celebrate the launch of the SHOP, I’ll be doing a LIVE Periscope Piano Workshop on Monday Nov. 9 at 10:00am CENTRAL featuring my early elementary and elementary piano pieces.  A few have been listed on the NFMC Junior Festival list before and are perennial favorites with boys especially.  I’ll play the pieces, discuss the principle teaching concepts for each, and tell you when you could introduce them if you’re using one of the popular piano methods.

WHAT’S PERISCOPE, did you say? — it’s a new app for Android and IOS phones and tablets that allows you to watch LIVE broadcasts for free.  You download the FREE app, create a quick profile for yourself, and “follow” a few folks whom you’d like to view whenever they broadcast.  And you can broadcast too!

TO JOIN PERISCOPE:

1.   If you’re on your mobile phone or tablet right now, click on the little “pianoprof88” button off to the right on the sidebar and it should take you to the Periscope app for download and then you can “FOLLOW” me.

or

2. Download the FREE Periscope app on your phone or tablet from the App Store (iPhone) or Google Play (Android).  Use your cell phone# or your Twitter account to sign up (use Twitter if you have it).  Set Notifications to “ON.”  Create your account and choose your @name.  Post a photo of yourself and bio on your profile when you get the chance.  Search for me “@pianoprof88″  and FOLLOW.  Whenever I’m about to broadcast, you’ll hear and see a little tweet alert on your device.

See you on the scope!

Side Note: To those of you who are already following me on Periscope, please follow me now on @pianoprof88 instead of the old account @pianoprof.  I had to change to a new account for good reasons.  On Monday, I’ll hop on the old account and alert you to follow me at the new account just in case.  Thanks!

 

 

 

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Benda’s “Sonatina in A minor” Piano Play-Along: Post Four (Take-Aways)

3
Hope you all enjoyed the Benda A Minor Sonatina Play-Along.  Even if you weren’t able to stay on schedule while it was happening, the beauty of a Play-Along is that you can jump in anytime even after the scheduled Play-Along has ended.   Make any Piano Play-Along our own self-guided project to learn a new piece and gain a little more insight about it.  But remember Play-Alongs are community projects also.  I want to hear your thoughts about the pieces whenever you “play-along”.    So….. practice a little, read a blog post along the way for insight, maybe make a comment on your findings, practice a little again, read another blog post, comment, etc.

I’m still hearing from folks who are reading along with the Kabalevsky Play-Along from last year.  I enjoy reading the comments and returning to the score to investigate someone else’s finding or suggestions. 🙂

BENDA INFOGRAPHIC

A little info about Benda to share with students…..

My take-aways from the Benda Play-Along:

  • This is a deservedly-popular and beloved piece for student pianists because of its engaging musical characteristics.  It offers tuneful melodies, dramatic harmonies, and finger-tickling toccata-style goodness with every measure.
  • The fact that it’s short, yet full of interesting twists and turns makes it appealing to students and its show-stopper quality is appealing to audiences as well.  Makes you wish there was more of it once it’s over.
  •  Excellent study in rhythm and part-writing for an aspiring intermediate pianist and offers opportunity to explore a good range of the keyboard.
    The student will have to count like a fiend and absorb many details in articulation, but the pay-off is worth it.
  •  I find that students continue to play this piece on their own even long after they’ve completed it.  That’s a good sign of a mesmerizing piece…..
  •  Studying the Supraphon edition at imslp.org was quite revealing.  It was surprising to see how over-edited this piece has become through the years and how inaccuracies have prevailed in student editions.
  • I think a NEW student edition is in order, one that reflects Benda’s first edition more accurately with added notes to students about pedaling, accurate distribution of the voices, repeats, etc.

I’m going to prepare a new student-friendly edition for the Piano Passport catalog, and include a short learning guide for mastery of the more difficult technical areas.  How does that sound?  More teachers and students should have quick access to this wonderful piece!

Please pipe in with your take-aways below…. would love to hear your thoughts.
Until next time!

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Benda’s “Sonatina in A minor” Piano Play-Along: Post Three (Tricky Passages )

Benda TPassages

piano_periscope_icon_mI hope you all have enjoyed the Benda A Minor Sonatina Play-Along with the Periscope enhancements this time.  I’ll continue to “scope”-along with our Play-Alongs.  🙂  I think it brings our score study to life and I enjoy how it builds even more community among participants in our group.  Please comment below with your thoughts on the addition of Periscope, and tell me if there are other aspects I could highlight during a scope session.   I’ll try to add more future student performances as I am able.  And….I’m working on a plan to SAVE some of the Play-Along Periscopes for later viewing after the 24-hour expiration.  Bear with me!

 

instagram-logoDon’t forget to watch the mini-video tutes on Instagram.  FOLLOW @pianoprof at Instagram and Periscope and set your notifications to ON.

 

 

Now that you’ve been playing the Sonatina for approximately 2 weeks, what do you think is the trickiest passage(s) in the piece? Either for you or a potential student?  Please ADD YOUR COMMENT BELOW with measure nos.
Of course, there could be several “tricky” spots for students when they first begin working on this piece and I remarked on those in an earlier Periscope.  For this post, I limiting it to the TWO spots that I think cause the most concern for the teacher and student.

1.  Measures 41-48
Benda Tricky Passage photo
This sudden change in texture really blindsides students at first.  At m. 41 they lose all rhythmic precision and suddenly slow the tempo way down.  I believe the root cause is the rhythmic shift from 16th-note subdivisions (mm.39-40) into eighths, then quarters later, and then dotted eighth-sixteenths, etc.  I find that students try to approximate the pacing of the eighths in m. 41 rather than count it precisely.

As mentioned in my Periscope, students must count like fiends in this area.  There’s just no way around it.  I have students count aloud from mm. 39 forward, by just saying the rhythms aloud first without playing.  While pointing to the rhythms in the score,  I have them count 16ths in mm. 39-40, followed by eighths in mm. 41-43, and so forth.  My students recite  “1-ee-and-a” for 16ths and “ 1 and “ for the eighths (you could choose another counting method if you prefer).  Once they get their lips wrapped around the counting, they truly know it and can direct their fingers to follow what they recite aloud.  While counting they can also listen for the steadiness of their tempo.  Of course, have them work hands apart as needed.

2.  Measure 44
Benda rest
This is the first and only pause in the entire piece.  Did you notice that? And it seems that students park themselves on this rest while they scurry to arrange their fingers quickly for the dotted rhythms.  Again, working hands separately and counting 16th subdivisions very precisely will assist in the entrance, but it’s the quick consecutive double-note manuevers in the RH that cause concern here.

Here’s the fingering I suggest for m. 44 (in the photo above – Supraphon edition):
RH:  5-1 to 4-1 then 3-1 to 2-1 (which lands on beat 1 of m. 45)
LH:  2 to 3 to 1 to 2 (which lands on beat 1 of m. 45)

NOTE:  Two notes for the RH and single notes for the LH. is exactly how Benda wrote it in his first edition according to the Supraphon editors.  For more info about this Czech edition, click HERE. 

PLAYING TIP:  Rather than play directly downward into the keys on the RH double notes, stay close to the keys and use a “sliding” motion with the hand as you play each pair of double notes.  The video below demonstrates.

When you time the sliding motions with your counting it all comes together so much more easily and there’s no fumbling around with the hand jumping about. Do you hear the student counting?  He makes it look easy, doesn’t he? But…..he’s always determined to solve issues by counting.

I hope this helps.  I look forward to your REPLIES below.  Please share so we all may compare notes, OK?  A little Benda “wrap-up” post will soon follow this one. Keep on practicing!

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Benda’s “Sonatina in A minor”: LIVE Student Performance on PERISCOPE!

FINAL BENDA Periscope

To celebrate the close of the BENDA A minor Sonatina PIANO PLAY-ALONG, join us on PERISCOPE for a LIVE student performance and interview- SAT, Oct 10, 12:15 Central Time. Learn about the student’s perspective of this piece and see him in action. He’ll take your questions LIVE. You must download the PERISCOPE app on your mobile device in order to interact with him. Once you do, FOLLOW @pianoprof and set notifications to ON. *** If you miss it, the REPLAY will be available for 24 hours on your device.

QUICK PERISCOPE  HOW-TO:

  1. Download the FREE Periscope app on your mobile device – cell phone or tablet.  Go to the Apple store or Google Play to download the app.
  2. Use your cell phone# or your Twitter account to sign up.
  3. Set Notifications to “ON.”
  4. Create your account and choose your @name.
  5. Post a photo of yourself and bio on your profile later if you prefer.
  6. Search for Elizabeth Gutierrez or “@pianoprof88”  and FOLLOW.
  7. Whenever I start a broadcast, you’ll hear and see a little tweet alert on your device.  You may REPLAY the broadcast later, but it expires after 24 hours.

Without the mobile app, you may view LIVE on the web here — www.periscope.tv/pianoprof88— but you receive an alert or be able to chat with everyone. REPLAY is available for 24 hours.

FOR ADVANCE NOTICE of FUTURE #PIANOSCOPES (piano teacher workshops on Periscope), go to the SIDEBAR just to your right and LIKE the Piano Camp for Piano Teachers FACEBOOK page.  In the LIKE area, choose GET NOTIFICATIONS.

That’s it!  See you Saturday on the #pianoscope!

 

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Benda’s “Sonatina in A minor” Piano Play-Along: Post Two (Edition Comparison)

Benda Post 2 header
piano_periscope_icon_mThanks to all of you who joined in on the PERISCOPE this past Monday morning, Sept. 28.  Hope you’re enjoying this method of relaying info!

THE NEXT PERISCOPE will be TIPS for TRICKY PASSAGES & PRACTICE TECHNIQUES – Tuesday, Oct. 6, 10 AM
Stay tuned to INSTAGRAM for video tips!

Here’s a summary of Monday’s PERSICOPE when I compared a researched edition of the Am Sonatina with the the modern editions available to us. I shared information I found in the Supraphon edition below ( a 1984 Czech edition edited by a Dr. Jan Racek and Vaclav Jan Sykora). The editor of the Suprahon edition, Mr. Sykora, consulted a rare print of Benda’s own 18th-century publication of sonatinas to create this edition below.

Supraphon

Editio Supraphon Praha – 1984

I located this score at the International Music Score Library project website HERE.  This website is an invaluable source to any musician looking for public domain music whether it be urtext editions, early editions, or something more scholarly than what you may own.  Downloads are available to you under some conditions which are stated at the site.  You should definitely refer to this site often when you question the authenticity of any score you own (for public domain music only; composers who died before 1922).
_____________________________________________________________________
STATEMENTS MADE in the SUPRAPHON PREFACE that apply to the A minor Sonatina:

  • Benda was indeed friends with CPE Bach whose friendship stimulated his growth as a musician.
  • The Allegro tempo indication is Benda’s own.
  • The notation in our modern editions is correct, with the exception that Benda used the soprano clef instead of the treble clef. The Supraphon editors         changed it to treble in their edition.
  • Benda always included specific ornamentation and it should be realized according to CPE Bach’s Essay on the True Art of Playing Keyboard Instruments (according to the editors).  After all, the two were close colleagues.
  • The rhythm in our modern editions is true and accurate, including the division of the hands (16ths).
  • – Dynamics are almost non-existent in Benda’s original, so what you see in today’s editions is editorial.  The Supraphon editors added dynamics based on the hammer action of the modern piano (i.e., areas of the piece with lots of rhythmic activity would be louder than those with little)
  • Phrasing that you see in our modern editions has been added (by this I mean slur markings) to follow modern principles of interpretation. Benda used phrase marks rather haphazardly.
  • Pedaling is entirely lacking in Benda’s original!  What you see in our modern editions is editorial.  Interesting…..
  • Fingering is not mentioned in the preface, but more than likely Benda didn’t include it.  In those days you were expected to know how to finger appropriately.

_____________________________________________________________________ COMPARISON of the SUPRAPHON edition vs. MODERN STUDENT EDITIONS on my desk. Get your pencils out.

PEDALING:
Note that Benda DID NOT include pedaling in any of his music according to the editors of the SUPRAPHON edition, so don’t be so inclined to strictly follow what you see in our modern editions.  The editors of the SUPRAPHON included some suggestions for pedaling the 16ths for a more “modern interpretation” and perhaps this is what our modern editors have been following.  In keeping with the Pre-Classical tradition, I would only add pedal for warmth and resonance in certain areas of this piece.  I advocate “half-pedalling” or “dabs of pedal” in order to make the piano ring a bit more in the forte areas.  The clarity of the 16ths should never be compromised or obscured.  I advise “undetectable” pedaling in this piece (i.e., no obvious blurriness).

ARTICULATION:

  • The staccatos you see in the modern editions are indeed Benda’s own, but note that the first 16th of the piece (RH “A”) should not be staccato as I notice in a couple of editions.
  • Slurs were not written by Benda, but if so, rather haphazardly.  The editors of the Supraphon editors included what you see in your scores for the most part, with a couple of minor instances in the LH.  (EX:  mm. 23-24 — the LH is detached).  Playing the LH quarter notes in detached style throughout would be considered stylistic for the time period if you preferred to do that.
  • Accents — m. 5 (F) and m. 29 (A) are the only accents included in the Supraphon edition, but the editors did not indicate if they added them or if they were Benda’s.
  • The leggiero indication in m. 17  — added by the Supraphon editors, but no mention of whether it’s Benda’s.  But it’s a good idea given the texture and the toccata style of this piece.

DYNAMICS:
Benda did not include any in his original, including hairpin cresc. or dim. marks. The editors of the Supraphon edition included the following  suggestions based on what keyboardists may have performed on early pianos (or harpsichords) of the time.

mm. 1 – 16 (A section):  All forte
m. 17 – piano
m. 23 – crescendo toward m. 25 — forte
m. 33 – piano
mm. 35-36, 39-40 – swells (cresc., then dim.)
m. 41 – piano
m. 44 – forte

* I generally agree with the editor’s suggested dynamics based on the texture and the performance practice of the time.  You certainly could add hairpin cresc. and dim. marks to certain areas of 16ths to create more melodic shape.  Nothing wrong with making your 16ths sound melodic on the piano, right?

ORNAMENTATION:  The only ornament Benda included is the trill in m. 42.  Since the sonatina is from the Pre-Classical period, it’s best to follow the practice of the time and perform the trill as a 4-note trill (E-D#-E-D#).

_____________________________________________________________________  Hope this revelation into the Supraphone edition helped.  Please feel free to comment BELOW with any other questions you might have about your score.  
See you TUESDAY, OCT. 6, 2015 at 10am CENTRAL TIME on PERISCOPE!  (find me @pianoprof)